Re-Using & Re-Upholstering Fun!

Does your city or town offer a re-using weekend like our Give-Away Weekend where neighbours put out working/bed-bug free items on the front curb for others to use instead of throwing them away? Well, every year, the kids and I like to go on a kind of scavenger hunt to look for completely useful stuff that others are just giving away to save the earth and money at the same time! And this year, we came across many items, including some bar stools that had clearly been well-used, but had potential for being used again.

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This is one of the stools before I tookΒ them apart – nice pattern but very worn and faded!

So the boys and I packed them up into our van and drove them home. They sat around for a while as I had just started working again and became very busy with that, but one day recently I finally sat down and decided to do some re-upholstering using some pop-culture Batman fabric I had got at the store before.

So I had previously unscrewed the chair pads from the stool frames, used a staple remover to take out all the staples, and took off the fabric and foam underneath as shown below.

barstool fabric mesh liner wood seat

I then washed the foam and fabrics on gentle cycle in the washer so they were nice and clean and wiped down the chairs as well. Next I laid out the old stool fabric onto the new fabric I bought and traced on the wrong side of the fabric the shape of the old one and cut out the pieces. Then I placed the new fabric face down, with the chair pad, and wood bottom on top and asked my hubby to carefully stretch the fabric over the edges of the bottom of the underside of the wood so I could staple gun the fabric onto the wood. Lastly, I placed the black mesh liner fabric on top of the stapled down printed fabric and stapled it down, then re-screwed the chair pad to the stool frame and repeated for the remaining chair. They turned out pretty good and the boys love to sit on them at our homemade breakfast nook! Bonus! πŸ˜›

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So it just goes to show, one person’s trash really is another person’s treasure – it just takes a little effort sometimes. πŸ˜‰

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DIY Fall Wreath

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Back when the leaves were just starting to fall off the trees, I finally got around to sitting down and working on a Fall wreath for our door. I had wanted to make one for a while so it felt good to finally do it! I had taken my boys to a playground that evening so my youngest offered to help me find the prettiest leaves (and he did)! After the kids went to bed I got to work using the basic straw wreath I had gotten for free on giveaway weekend, (the best idea ever here in Winnipeg), and started wrapping it half in burlap, and half in ribbon. I had done a general search online to get inspired, then took elements of different wreaths I saw online and combined them to make something more personal. Of course I had to make it a monogram wreath, even more special! πŸ™‚ So I got out my hot glue gun and started gluing all the leaves to the bottom in beautiful array, adding on a craft ladybug on top afterwards since I find them cute! I figure that even though the leaves will dry out and crumble, I can always add new ones on next year so why not? Its nice to have that natural element in there anyways. πŸ™‚

I also took a wooden craft ring I had and made the monogram with a piece of paper trimmed to the same size circle and glued to the back of it. I enjoy drawing so I added some extra touches to the letter ‘F’ and coloured it in. Using a ribbon I had tied around the ring prior to gluing the paper to the back, I tied the ring to the wreath itself, being careful to center it in the wreath. And I wrote a ‘Welcome’ sign on the other side of the circle in case it ever flips over when closing the door. πŸ™‚ Then I got out my wreath hanger, and hung it on the door, all set to be viewed by whoever comes by! Yay! I finally got this done, feels good to do crafts – it’s been too long! I am thankful that I get to do stuff like this still, and that my boys are young enough to appreciate it. πŸ™‚ What have you been up to??

~Roxy~

DIY City!

It’s been crazy over at our house – between re-organizing, DIY, and just overall busyness, yup, crazy! But at the same time, it feels good to get things out of the way that should have probably been done a long time ago, but just never got done. Sometimes I think it takes a bit of frustration to get the final push to be inspired and to do something you’ve wanted to do for a while, because hey, we all get lazy or tired don’t we? Add to that a new job and a busy season, and it’s cause for chaos, but thankfully God is here! I have been praying non-stop, and asking for prayers too on different matters, and God is so Good! He has been letting us know just how much He cares, and though we know this, it’s been rough at times when we’re on the edge of our seats so to speak, waiting for answered prayers. Thank you to all who have been praying with us, you know who you are! πŸ™‚ And so, I’d like to share a couple projects with you that I’ve been working on – here and there.

DIY Breakfast Bar

Every time we’ve dismantled an old TV unit or otherwise, we’ve been keeping the boards for future projects, and being someone who enjoys repurposing, here is one thing I came up with: a mini breakfast bar for our narrow kitchen! It was too crowded with the square table we had in the kitchen so I decided to use that as my sewing table now, and to put up a simple shelf in the kitchen to save space and for the boys to sit at/rest stuff on without taking up all our floor space – and the kids love it! (bonus!) It only took one evening to do too, so even if your time is limited, you can do something like this to free up space πŸ™‚

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Basically, I used my stud finder to locate the wall studs, drew some faint pencil lines to mark where those were on the wall, then drew a straight line across the stud lines (using my level). Next, I held the shelf brackets against the wall at the stud points one at a time as I traced the screw holes onto the wall for drilling points, making sure to put the brackets evenly along the level pencil line. I pre-drilled deep holes into the wall studs, got out my drywall screws, screwed the brackets to the wall, then I found some short screws, layed the shelf carefully on top of the brackets, traced the bracket holes onto the bottom of the shelf, (making sure the shelf was sitting evenly across the brackets), pre-drilled shallow holes into the bottom of the shelf, then screwed on the shelf to the brackets – et voila! A mini breakfast bar!

DIY Inset Bedroom Shelf

My youngest’s room has always had a little nook sort of in the wall, so I finally decided to make it into an inset bedroom shelf to clear up his floor as his room is pretty tiny and it always gets messy. As I layed out the brackets (which were just repurposed baseboards), I got the idea to make the bottom shelf into an inset desk for him to sit at since there isn’t room for a separate desk in his room. So off I went to work measuring, leveling and cutting boards! This was way trickier than the other shelf as one of the walls is at a weird angle so the back of the shelf is slightly shorter than than the front, hence, I had to measure out the exact shape onto the repurposed shelving from my father-in-law. It worked, but it was a lot more complicated than I wanted it to be. However, that’s to be expected with an older house I guess lol! Anyways, in the end I’m quite happy with it, it’s not perfect, but its perfect for my little guy and he likes it so that’s all that matters πŸ™‚

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As you can see, he can fit quite a bit of his stuff on there, plus there’s room enough at the bottom that he can work on his kid computer or play with his mini house. πŸ™‚ Cute!

Hope your DIY projects are going well, and God Bless you!

P.S. – Feel free to share your own adventures in DIY by leaving a msg below. And if you like what you see, please Pin some for me! Thanks!

Keep Going!

~Roxy~

DIY Upholstered Headboard

Hello Readers,

Wow, 2 posts in a week? This is crazy! Maybe I’ll get used to bloggin afterall. ;p But seriously, this is awesome because I’m such a big procrastinator sometimes (when it comes to my own stuff anyways), so I’m happy I’ve been getting some projects done. What I want to share with you today is something that I’ve been wanting to make since before Christmas 2012, and that is – a headboard! Sounds simple enough, and really it is, but sometimes things can seem more tedious than they really are. It’s weird how that works, but really this was pretty easy and with a bit of careful planning and measuring, anyone can make one.

Here’s how I made mine:

First, and foremost, get a vision of how you want to decorate your room. Keep in mind colour scheme, even if you haven’t gotten everything else done yet (ie- painting), that way when you do get everything finished it will all go together. I picked out a nice sheer grey fabric based on the colour scheme we want for our room in the near future. But before I could pick out the fabric of course, my hubby and I measured the width and height of the headboard as we wanted it to be, then we got a piece of plywood cut for us to those dimensions. We ordered our foam from a family friend who works at a factory, though you can also buy some from fabric or craft stores. I didn’t use batting in mine, but many people use batting and foam underneath their material. That’s totally up to you, but I personally didn’t find it necessary.

What you will need:

  • basic tools like a drill/screwdriver, level, measuring tape, straight edge, hammer, stud finder (if hanging)
  • pencil
  • fabric (dimensions dependent on size of headboard, but add about 10″ extra per side for wrap around)
  • an iron (if you want to make sure your fabric is nice and wrinkle free before upholstering)
  • 2″-3″ thick foam (dimensions also dependent on headboard size, plus 6″ extra per side for wrap around)
  • cotton batting (optional – if using, keep foam dimensions exactly size of board, and add 6″ extra to sides of batting for wrap around)
  • plywood (width of your bed plus whatever overhang you want, height however tall you want it)
  • hooks and eyelets (# determined by how heavy your board is/what size)
  • upholstery tacks or heavy duty staple gun + staples
  • spray adhesive is optional
  • may need a craft knife if cutting foam thinner for wrap around
  • someone to help you out isn’t necessary, but suggested!
  • camera (optional) – to take a picture of your finished product πŸ™‚

So after I bought the fabric, plywood and foam, along with some cute floral tacks from the craft department at Walmart, I was ready to start upholstering!

I laid out my freshly washed and ironed fabric on the floor, good side facing down, then placed the foam and plywood on top, centred it, then cut excess fabric from around the edges. Note: I left about 2-3 inches extra trim around to account for wrap around, but this could have been an extra inch longer to wrap it around the bottom of the foam at the back better. I also ended up using my craft knife to thin out the excess foam that stuck out the sides from my headboard for easier wrap around, and to better accomodate the length of my tacks – I highly recommend it! I trimmed it to about half to a third the thickness of the foam, which overall took about an extra half an hour, maybe less, but worth it. If you prefer to use cotton batting, then you can skip this step and just keep your foam the same dimensions as the board and wrap your batting around the back, so long as it’s bigger than the board. This way was just a lot cheaper.

I researched headboards online first and though many people suggest to spray the foam with a spray adhesive first so it doesn’t move around, I didn’t bother. I take a very simple approach to things and if it’s not necessary, it’s just not. But I did do what many say to do regarding tacking, and that’s to start from the middle of the headboard and work your way outward. This helps with stretching the fabric evenly over the foam and backboard and for tacking purposes. If you prefer, you may also use a handy staple gun – I didn’t, as after my last project, I found out my staple gun is just not that heavy duty and tacks work much better for me. Plus they have flowers on them, so the cuteness factor was definitely a plus. πŸ™‚

I asked my 5 yr-old to sit on the fabric at the side to keep it from moving for the first few tacks, and hammered those things in good. After that, it was just a matter of spacing them out evenly. My one word of caution with tacking, is that the tacks do bend quite easily and can snap apart if bent too much, so get extra tacks! They are cheap so won’t burn a hole in your pocket, and if there’s extra left over at the end, all the more better to have some for your next project. I did two opposite sides at a time, then switched to the other sides, leaving the corners open for the moment.

Since I was running low on tacks after breaking some, my hubby helped me to nail in the corners by folding over the fabric neatly and holding it taught while he quickly and accurately hammered the nails into the board. It takes some skill with a hammer as if your tack is not hit in the center, they will bend and break. I’d recommend making this with a friend for all the reasons above and more – plus it’s more fun with help! ^_^ After getting the corners nailed, I stood it against the wall to admire our handywork.

Below: Laying out the fabric, foam and plywood – foam already thinned out, and tacking down fabric!

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Below: My youngest took this photo me because he wanted to – he’s a little photographer in the making!

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Below: Close-up of fabric and corner of headboard at back.

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The next step was to hang it! So again I got my hubby to assist in measuring where exactly we would place our headboard by using the measuring tape and a straight edge, (in this instance my T-square), to evenly mark out where the edges of the headboard would go with faint pencil on the wall. Next we attached a long board to the back of the headboard (could have done this before we upholstered it, but didn’t think we’d have to). So my hubby screwed on the board (I used some scrap wood salvaged from an old tv-unit), and cut another piece to extend it since it wasn’t quite long enough. Use whatever you have first, provided it’s the right thing for the job; it’s handy and it’s being responsible with your money/resources.

We determined that 4 hooks and eyelets were what we felt comfortable using to hang this board, as it was pretty light and those things can hold heavier stuff than that. Depending on what your board is like, you may decide to use french cleats (sort of like ledges with an angled edge that you hang like a puzzle one atop the other, one attached to the wall, the other to the headboard). Others may decide that they’d like to go the traditional route and attach posts to either side of the headboard and let it sit atop of that. It’s your choice, so have fun with it!

Basically, we took our stud finder, found four spots on the wall that were in line with each other, marked those out in pencil on the wall, then measured out the same distance across the back of our headboard where the added board was, and pre-drilled all the holes in both.

I had tried to use a different type of hanging clip originally with a moveable ring, but that was just too tricky to hang so I ended up getting the correct hanging tool the second time around. But that’s DIY for you – you learn as you go! ^_~ Nothing wrong with that in my book. So anyways, we finally got the right hooks so I finished off the screwing into the headboard and wall this evening and I’m quite pleased with the outcome. I may try to use some of the excess fabric to make matching pillows or curtains. Oh you thought I was done? Never. ;p

Below: Photos of the hooks and eyelets I used. They were 1 3/8″ and 1 7/16″ respectively, though you could use whatever size suits your board.

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And finally – the finished product below!

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DIY Costume Closet

Whoever said you need lots of money to organize was wrong – because I just pray for stuff to use, and God provides the tools,material,and even the furniture to do it! Not kidding, but that is clearly a blessing to find everything I need for either free or cheap. And I realize this so I’m so thankful for everything. This time I decided that the boy’s closets were hindering them from seeing/using their multitude of superhero costumes, (yes, they’re fans too), so I thought to myself, “I should build them a costume closet.” I didn’t know how I was going to afford such a thing, but I knew that God would provide a means in some way. So I kept an eye online and noticed one day that someone was giving away an old armoire. I didn’t know what it looked like, but from their post online, it sounded like something I could use. So I arranged to pick it up with my hubby, and we drove out to their house to get it. It was missing the doors and pretty used looking, but that didn’t matter to me, I saw it’s potential so we happily took it off their hands. As we were driving home I was already imagining what I could do with it. I knew I had some caster wheels at home which I could put on the bottom, which is awesome so I could make it into a costume cart. And after seeing what some people did on Pinterest with similar furniture I was inspired. So I planned out a little what I was going to do with it, and set to work demoing it. I had to use a crow bar, hammer, and chisel, so I was ready for business. I’m sure the kids were wondering what I was doing hammering in the rec room as they played upstairs, but I told them I wanted to wait until I was done more to show them. Of course, that didn’t last long so they had to take a sneak peek here and there. This is what they saw:

So I managed after a while to pull off the back which was cut up anyways and to take a couple shelves out along with some annoying support pieces that had long staples in them. Then for safety I hammered down all the stapes in the pieces I removed which was a chore in itself, but I didn’t mind as it meant I was getting stuff done (I had been in a creative slump lately, so it was nice not to procrastinate). I also gave the whole thing a good wipe down to make sure it was sanitary as possible as it had been sitting outside at the other’s person’s house. And I took measurements for the fabrics that I had on hand which I decided to use to line the inside of it. I was a bit loose with the bottom fabrics on measuring, more like eyeballing as I knew that no one would really see this when covered by costumes. So I cut up some fabrics, (which I got for free from Arts Junktion btw), and started staple-gunning them down to the floor of the closet. Next thing I had to put the whole thing on it’s side, to lay down fabric for the inside sides, one at a time. I measured off some fabric, then decided to try putting a bit of tacky glue down the edges first, afterwards laying down the fabric on top and slowly pulling the fabric taut as I staple-gunned it down. After doing this on one side I determined the glue unnecessary, and so just used the staple gun by itself on the other side. I had my hubby drill some holes at the top where I measured out the closet rod would go. What did I use for the closet rod you ask? Why an old broken kid’s rake which I just sawed up to fit and then my hubby helped screw it in place from the outside. After the rod was in place, it was pretty much ready to test out, and I was excited to show the boys so I brought them down and they were happy about it too. To help organize the accessories I decided to put a couple big bins with handles on top of the closet too. And now whenever they want to play superheroes, it’s a lot easier to reach, (especially for my almost 5 year old), and they can clearly see all their costumes right in front of them. And I’m thinking, “Man, I wish I had this when I was a kid.”

Here’s the finished closet, (minus perhaps some future paint on the outside):

Lol! So if you’re in a similar predicament I encourage you to dream big, without worrying about the finances, and pray. God will provide, and inspire.

Blessings,

Roxy

DIY Closet Reno

So because we’re in a century plus old house, our closet rod at the front fell down the other day completely. But good thing it did in a way because it allowed me to see what the space looked like without it in. And I decided to move the bar to the other wall for something different. Sometimes what appears to be something bad is a blessing in disguise (actually most times it is). So I set to work thinking of how I was going to mount the closet rod again and planned what board I would use for the shelf on top etc.

After a day or so, I was able to go to the store and pick up a couple new closet rod brackets at the Home Depot which would work nicely ($10) and wouldn’t break my budget. By the way, I almost always try to do things the cheapest way possible because I love to see how I can repurpose things I find for free or laying around our workshop in the basement. So it just so happened we had an old but ding-free board from an entertainment unit in the basement which I chose for my shelf. Next I had to measure how long the shelf would need to be, so I took my tape measure and measured off the space for the closet, and asked my hubby to cut the board accordingly (he used our jigsaw which I cannot bring myself to use yet). So after that, I held up the board and took a bracket in hand, and drew lines under the shelf where the holes would be drilled for the screws to go in from the underside of the brackets. This part was tricky doing on my own, but I didn’t have much choice as my hubby was laying down with a headache/sore muscles. I finally managed to get everything lined up and marked the holes out. Then I got ready to drill holes into the shelf board, matching up the appropriate sized drill bits for the screws that came with the brackets. To make things easier, I first attached the brackets to the bottom of the shelf, then I decided to attach the brackets to the wall. I’m glad there was already some boards along the wall to rest the shelf on at one side, which helped when propping everything up. I was able to secure the top screws into the wall through this board, but next I had to cut some short boards to go in behind the bottom half of the shelf brackets along the wall since there was a gap there between the wall and the brackets. So I cut two equal-sized boards, and nailed them to the wall behind the brackets. Next I drilled holes for the screws to go into the bottom fo the brackets and put those screws in. Everything went pretty good overall, I just had a bit of trouble at one point when I went to drill some holes and the drill bit wasn’t quite lined up properly so when I went to drill, the bit came out sideways a bit and scraped one of my fingers which was holding the board… 😦  Thankfully I didn’t drill a hole in my hand! But lesson learned – always make sure the drill bit is in straight!!

So there you have it, I was able to finish putting up this closet in one evening and finished hanging back up all our jackets and sweaters. Next step will be to put in some hooks for my cleaning supplies since I don’t have a linen/broom closet. Catch you next time, folks!

Regards,

Roxy